The Salary Calculator

2014 Budget

Later today, the Chancellor will deliver his 2014 Budget to parliament, setting out his plans for the next few years. The Budget is the Chancellor’s opportunity to explain his policies and how they will affect the economy as a whole, and also what differences will be felt by ordinary members of the public.

He is likely to make much of the fact that the tax-free personal allowance (how much you can earn without paying income tax) has increased to £10,000 from April 2014, a coalition pledge delivered 1 year early. There is also talk that he might announce plans to raise the threshold for 40% tax (the amount at which you start paying income tax at 40% rather than 20%) in future years. This would probably lower the tax paid by those in middle management positions, say, and those in more senior roles.

The income tax and National Insurance rates which will take effect from 6th April 2014 have already been applied to The Salary Calculator, so you can easily see how your take home pay will be affected by the new tax year. You can also view a side-by-side comparison of 2013 and 2014 so you can see where the differences come from.

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None of the content on this website, including blog posts, comments, or responses to user comments, is offered as financial advice. Figures used are for illustrative purposes only.

April 2014 tax rates applied

The Salary Calculator has been updated with the latest tax information which takes effect from 6th April 2014.

There is an increase in the default tax free personal allowance from £9,440 to £10,000, which will reduce the amount of tax due for most taxpayers. Slight increases in the National Insurance thresholds will also help improve the takehome pay for many people.

The most significant change is probably the increase in the repayment threshold for plan 1 student loans from £16,365 per year to £16,910, which will save those repaying their loan nearly £50 over the year. Unfortunately of course, this will just mean it will take longer to repay the loan in the long run but hopefully the extra cash in your pocket will be useful now!

Another significant change this year, which is unlikely to affect any but those who are well paid and nearing retirement, is a reduction in the maximum amount you can put into a pension while still claiming full tax relief – for 2013/14 this limit was £50,000 but from 2014/15 it will be £40,000. If this is likely to affect you, you still have time to make the most of the 2013/14 pension allowance before the end of the tax year!

To see how you will be affected by the new tax rates, go to The Salary Calculator and choose the 2014/15 tax year from the drop-down box. Alternatively, you can view a side-by-side comparison of 2013 and 2014 tax rates.

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A fresh start in the New Year?

2014 has arrived, and for many people the start of a new year is a time to make a clean break with the past, and move on to new things. Often people join a gym, start a diet (after the excesses of the festive period!) – or look for a new job.

The new job could be a promotion at your current place of work, or a new opportunity elsewhere – and The Salary Calculator can help you as you consider your options. If you’re wondering what a new salary might mean for your monthly take-home, check it out on the take-home pay calculator. If you know how much you need each month and would like to know what kind of salary you should be looking for, try using the required salary calculator.

You might be considering supplementing your income not by getting a new job, but by being self-employed in your spare time. In which case, you can try out the tools at our sister site Employed and Self Employed, which will help you to see how your tax and National Insurance contributions will be affected by your additional income.

If you are making a new start in 2014, best of luck!

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Monday, January 6th, 2014 Jobs, Pay As You Earn No Comments

Becoming self-employed rather than un-employed

I read an interesting article this morning on the BBC News website about the phenomenon of people who are unemployed deciding to become self-employed rather than keep looking for “traditional” employment. Apparently, a significant number of people have found that it is difficult to find a job, but that they have been able to start and run promising businesses themselves – something they have found much more fulfilling than taking Jobseeker’s Allowance.

Our sister site Employed and Self Employed has a tax calculator you can use to see how much tax and National Insurance would be deducted from self employment profits, if you are thinking of starting your own business. There is also a more complex calculator if you already have a job but are thinking of becoming self-employed in your spare time – you can work out how much of your profits you would be able to keep hold of.

If you are unemployed and thinking of starting your own business, you may be eligible for some funds from the government to help you get started. More information is available here about the New Enterprise Allowance.

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Salary Sacrifice and charitable giving

A new update to The Salary Calculator allows you to enter deductions which were previously not available. Among the usual options is one for Salary Sacrifice, if you have contractually agreed to reduce your salary by a certain amount in exchange for receiving some other benefit. There are also new options for pre-tax deductions such as Gift Aid and Give As You Earn and after-tax deductions which are just taken out of your payslip each month.

Salary Sacrifice is often used for pension contributions, but The Salary Calculator already has an option for Salary Sacrifice pensions under the “Pension” tab where you can enter a percentage of your salary to be deducted. If you prefer to enter the monthly (or annual) £ amount that you are sacrificing, you can leave the pension field blank and enter the £ amount in the “Salary Sacrifice” tab. Alternatively, you might be making a salary sacrifice for benefits other than a pension (or in addition to a pension) – in which case just enter the amount you’ve sacrificed into the new field.

The “Other Deductions” tab has two new fields on it. One is for pre-tax deductions, like Gift Aid or other charitable contributions like Give As You Earn. The second is for after-tax deductions – i.e. an amount deducted from your take-home pay each month with no impact on your tax or National Insurance.

Head over the The Salary Calculator to check out these new options. I hope you find these new options useful – if you have any feedback or thoughts (or suggestions for other things to be added), please let me know!

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