Student Loan

Updated for April 2021

by Admin

The Salary Calculator has been updated with the tax rates which take effect from 6th April 2021. Some of these rates are still subject to confirmation by the relevant governments, but the calculator will be updated if any of them change.

The biggest change is the introduction of “Plan 4” student loan repayments, for Scottish students. If your undergraduate loan is administered in Scotland and due for repayment you will start repaying under Plan 4 from April 2021, even if you have been previously repaying under Plan 1. Those already repaying their loans will switch from Plan 1 to Plan 4 repayments in April. This change does not affect students in England, Wales or Northern Ireland, and nor does it affect repayment of postgraduate loans.

If you would like to see the effects of this change, and any others from April 2021, try out The 2021 Salary Calculator by choosing the “2021/22” tax year from the drop-down box.

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None of the content on this website, including blog posts, comments, or responses to user comments, is offered as financial advice. Figures used are for illustrative purposes only.

New tool – Sick Pay Calculator

by Admin

With many people having to take time off work due to the current situation with COVID-19, I thought I would try to create a sick pay calculator. If you will be taking time off, and your employer’s policy states that you will receive reduced (or no) pay for your time off, the Sick Pay Calculator will try to estimate the effect on your take-home pay.

You can enter the number of days on a percentage of your normal pay (e.g. 50% for half pay), the number of days on Statutory Sick Pay (n.b. the calculator is not able to tell whether or not you are eligible for SSP, learn more from Citizens Advice), and the number of unpaid days. The calculator will use this information to estimate how your payslip will change.

Please note that different employers calculate things like unpaid leave in different ways, so the calculator’s results may differ from those on your payslip. Also, how much you will get paid for time off depends primarily on what your employer’s relevant policies state – you will need to know what you are entitled to before using the calculator.

Please let me know if you have any trouble using the calculator – I’ve tried to reduce the number of unexpected results, but it is possible with a lot of time off and with many options such as pensions and student loans applied that the answers given might be a bit unusual!

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April 2020 calculations

by Admin

The Salary Calculator has been updated with the tax rates which currently stand to take effect from 6th April 2020. I say “currently”, because there is a Budget taking place on Wednesday 11th March and it is possible that some changes to tax rates or allowances will be announced. If this is the case, the calculator will be updated with the latest values as soon as possible following the Budget.

At the moment, no changes to the tax-free personal allowance or income tax rates have been announced (apart from in Scotland, where some tax thresholds have been increased slightly). However, the threshold for when you start paying National Insurance has increased, meaning that National Insurance contributions will be reduced by up to £104 per year.

Those repaying their undergraduate student loans will also find that the repayment threshold has increased – for Plan 1 it will be £19,390, and Plan 2 £26,575 per year. Although this increase will reduce the payments you make in each payslip, it will of course mean that it takes longer to repay your loan.

If you’d like to see how the changes will affect you, head over to The Salary Calculator and remember to choose 2020/21 from the Tax Year drop-down box.

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New! Two Jobs Salary Calculator

by Admin

I have finally been able to deliver something that has been on my “to-do” list for several years – a salary calculator for when you have two jobs at the same time. If you are considering taking on a second job to help make ends meet, or if you have two part-time jobs rather than one full-time job, it isn’t easy to work out what your take-home pay will be. If you’d like to try it out and see what a difference an extra job could make, head over to the Two Jobs Salary Calculator.

All the usual options are there, such as pension contributions, bonuses and overtime, to help you see all the details in one place. You can use the calculator without a tax code, or with a single tax code for both jobs, or with individual tax codes for each job if you have been given them by HMRC.

It can be quite complicated to work out the tax and other deductions for those who are working two jobs, so I hope this will be useful to some of you. It was also quite difficult to find a way to display all the options (like pension contributions from both jobs) without making it too hard to use. I hope I have succeeded, I look forward to hearing from people who have used it.

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New! Postgraduate Loan Repayment

by Admin

Starting from April 2019, repayment of new Postgraduate Student Loans will be done through Pay As You Earn (PAYE). As The Salary Calculator has just been updated with the April 2019 figures, repayment of postgraduate loans has been added so, if this applies to you, you can see what effect this will have on your take home pay.

These loan repayments are in addition to Plan 1 and Plan 2 student loan repayments, which you may have from undergraduate courses you have studied. Postgraduate loan repayments are calculated as 6% of gross annual earnings over £21,000. More information is available from the Student Loans Company.

Also, so you can see how your loans are being repaid, if you select more than one loan type on The Salary Calculator you will be able to click for a breakdown of how the repayments are distributed to your different student loans.

Because this only comes in to effect from April 2019, in order to see the effect of postgraduate loan repayments you will need to select “2019/20” from the Tax Year drop-down. Head over to The Salary Calculator to check it out!

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