Archive for July, 2020

New – Maternity and Paternity pay calculations

You may remember that a short while ago, I added a calculator for sick pay and unpaid leave. It was natural for me to consider the effects of maternity / paternity pay, too, as this can have a similar effect on your take-home pay – and Statutory Maternity Pay and Statutory Sick Pay are calculated in quite similar ways. I have now added this option to the maternity pay salary calculator.

You will notice that this is the same calculator – the Sick Pay Calculator has been expanded to include statutory parental pay as an option. If you will be taking some maternity or paternity leave, you can estimate the effect on your payslip by entering the details of your salary, days per week that you work, and how many days in the pay period you will be taking as leave. If your employer offers some of your leave at full pay then you don’t need to enter these days. If you are receiving some leave at 90% pay (you are normally entitled to this for the first 6 weeks of maternity leave) then use the % pay fields to handle those days. And for any days in the pay period that you will be receiving Statutory Maternity (or Paternity) Pay, currently £151.20 per week, use the Statutory Parental Leave field.

Important note! All calculations provided are estimates and indicative only. Different employers have different leave policies (for sick pay and for parental pay), they also calculate leave in different ways. You may not be entitled to statutory pay. The calculator does not know what you are entitled to, only what you have entered. If you are paid monthly, or have an irregular work schedule, Statutory Pay can fluctuate from pay period to pay period, which the calculator does not allow for. More information about maternity pay is available from Gov.UK.

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None of the content on this website, including blog posts, comments, or responses to user comments, is offered as financial advice. Figures used are for illustrative purposes only.

The salary calculator you need for Australia

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The idea of working in Australia is a dream for many Britons and a reality for many more. Naturally though, the employment system – and more importantly, the wage payment system – is not always the same as that in the UK. In some cases, it’s just a matter of terminology, but in other areas it is more substantial.

However, thanks to one of the most popular and trusted finance organisations in Australia, figuring out what you can expect in your pay packet when you work Down Under, has been made a whole lot easier.

The Industry Super group (more about them later) recently added a simple, reliable salary calculator to their website. Its simplicity reflects the streamlined wage system in Australia and takes into account current tax rates – including whether you’re a resident or a visitor – and the Medicare Levy, as well as providing an estimate of the minimum superannuation (pension) payment from an employer. Let’s look at this one first.

 Superannuation

In Australia, the two main sources of income an employee can expect in retirement are the government age pension (much like the UK State Pension) and payments from their ‘superannuation’ (similar to our occupational or personal pensions).

By law, all businesses must make contributions to their employees’ superannuation (pension) account. This is called the Superannuation Guarantee, and currently, employers must contribute at least 9.5% of an employee’s wage on top of their salary. It is compulsory and cannot be bargained out of.

The theory is that businesses make regular payments into the fund, and when it comes time to retire, the worker has a healthy nest egg waiting for them, since super can’t be touched early and all funds try and achieve a good return on investment for their account-holders.

Every full-time and part-time employee is eligible for super, as are casual workers who are 18 years or over and earning more than $450 in a single calendar month. (The same rules apply for casuals under 18 who work more than 30 hours per week). This means that even those on a working holiday can be entitled to super.

There are two main types of super fund in Australia.

‘Retail’ funds are those owned and managed by banks and other financial services companies.

‘Industry’ funds are member-owned super funds with profits going to members, and for the past decade have tended to outperform their retail counterparts (source: Money Management Australia). As the name implies, industry super funds were originally set up for workers in specific industries, however nowadays, almost all of them are open to anyone.  Industry Super is the peak body for industry funds in Australia.

Tax rates and brackets

Australia’s tax system is managed by the Australian Taxation Office, usually just called the ATO. It looks after all aspects of national tax and also manages employers’ Superannuation Guarantee compliance.

Tax rates vary as a person earns more. There are also different tax rates depending on whether you are an Australian resident, a foreign resident or there on a working holiday. Thankfully, the Industry Super salary calculator can be customised to take your specific circumstance into account by clicking the ‘Adjust your situation’ button.

Medicare

An amount under ‘Medicare Levy’ is included in calculations.

Like the NHS, Australia has a modern, reliable and highly-regarded public health system through its universal health care insurance scheme called ‘Medicare’ (not to be confused with the US ‘Medicare’)

Instead of being funded through regular taxation however, it is primarily subsidised through the Medicare Levy, which is added to a person’s annual tax bill each year, based on their income.

Non-residents and those on a working holiday are generally exempt from paying the Medicare Levy, and again, this is recognised by the customisable calculator, and shown when you choose the ‘View tax breakdown’ option.

Other factors

The calculator also takes into account certain tax offsets that the Australian Government offers to low and middle income-earners once they submit their annual tax return, and also offers suggestions on reducing annual tax by making voluntary contributions to superannuation.

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Monday, July 20th, 2020 Foreign Currency, Income Tax, Jobs, Pensions No Comments

Plans for re-starting the economy

It has been a turbulent few months for many of us, with jobs being cut, furloughing schemes, working from home and closure of many businesses (small and large). Last week, Chancellor Rishi Sunak announced a number of measures which are designed to help us along the road to recovery. It is going to take several months (or even longer) and things may never quite be the same – but here are a few of the measures which have been announced:

A cut in VAT on hospitality – restaurants and hotels will see the VAT on their goods reduced from 20% to 5%. For consumers, it is possible that this will mean lower prices but businesses are under no obligation to pass this saving on. They may keep their prices the same and use the VAT saving to try to repair some of the damage caused by their enforced closure over the last few months, or to try to allow for fewer customers as social distancing regulations mean that they can’t seat as many people as before.

A temporary removal of stamp duty on house purchases under £500,000 – if you were planning to move house before March 2021, this may well save you a significant amount of money. Previously, any house sold for more than £125,000 attracted stamp duty (often thousands or tens of thousands of pounds) which the buyer had to pay on top of the purchase price. Until March of next year, the threshold has been increased to £500,000, in an attempt to encourage people to buy and re-energise the housing market.

A bonus paid to employers who retain furloughed employees – if an employer keeps an employee who was furloughed on the payroll until the end of January 2021, they will be eligible for a one-off £1000 bonus. This is to encourage employers to keep people on and prevent unemployment, even if business doesn’t pick up immediately now that lockdown has been loosened.

There were several schemes announced which are intended to encourage employers to employ 16-24 year olds.

A full run-down of the measures announced is available from the BBC.

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Wednesday, July 15th, 2020 Economy, Jobs No Comments

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