Archive for April, 2021

What you need to know about the new 1257L tax code

The world of tax can sometimes feel confusing. That said, it’s essential to stay informed and up-to-date with the latest tax changes. 

At The Salary Calculator, we’re here to help you every step of the way. So, there’s no need to worry.

One of the recent tax changes is the introduction of the new 1257L tax code. In this article, we’ll explain:

  • What the 1257L tax code is
  • What the numbers and letters mean
  • Who the tax code applies to 
  • The amount of tax you must pay under the 1257L tax code
  • What to do if you think you have the wrong tax code

What is the 1257L tax code?

The 1257L tax code informs employers or pension providers how much tax you owe the government each month. It’s the most common tax code for 2021/22 and can be found on your payslip.

In line with finance minister Rishi Sunak’s announcement in March 2021, this tax code is expected to stay the same until 2026.

The tax code for the previous year was 1250L.

What do the numbers and letters mean?

Understanding the numbers and letters within the tax code is pretty straightforward. They indicate:

  • The amount of tax-free income you are entitled to
  • The amount of tax you must pay above the personal allowance
  • Whether other circumstances must be considered

The number 1257 refers to the £12,570 personal allowance, and the letter L entitles you to a standard tax-exempt personal allowance.

An emergency tax code is indicated by the letters “W1”, “M1”, or “X” and is used in a number of situations. 

If an individual begins a new job, starts receiving a state pension, or begins working for an employer after a stint of self-employment, these letters will be attached to their tax code.

Who does the tax code apply to?

The 1257L tax code is typically used for individuals who have one registered employment, with no unpaid tax, tax-exempt income or taxable benefits.

How much tax must I pay under the 1257L tax code?

If an individual has the 1257L tax code, they can earn £12,570 before they are taxed. Per month this allowance works out as £1,047.

Above this threshold, individuals will be taxed on income earned. So, if you earn between £12,571 and £50,270, you will be taxed at the basic rate of 20%. 

Meanwhile, earnings within the bracket of £50,271 and £150,000 are taxed at the higher rate of 40%.  If you earn over £150,000, you’ll be taxed the additional rate of 45%.

What if I think I have the wrong tax code?

There are a number of legitimate reasons why your tax code may not be 1257L. That said, sometimes mix-ups happen, and you can end up with the wrong tax code. This can happen if you’ve recently changed jobs or if you’ve started a new job while receiving your pension.

Whatever the reason, if you think your tax code is wrong, it’s easy to fix. All you need to do is reach out to HMRC and tell them as soon as you spot the mistake. 

Contact HMRC either by phone on 0300 200 3300 or speak to an adviser via the HMRC Webchat.

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Wednesday, April 28th, 2021 Income Tax No Comments

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