Mortgages

Our guide to mortgages

by Madaline Dunn

Deciding to get a mortgage can be an extremely exciting move. That said, it’s not without its complications, and people can feel a little bit bewildered by the process. A recent study by Paymentshield found that over half of adults (52%) aged 18-34 have a poor understanding of the mortgage process. The study also found that 32% of 35 to 44-year olds have a similar lack of understanding.

That said, it’s important to make sure that you’re all clued up when it comes to mortgages so that you get the best deal possible.

It has been widely reported that there’s currently an ongoing price war in the mortgage market, with some lenders offering super-low rates. For example, HSBC and TSB recently unveiled mortgage rates below 1%, with an interest rate of just 0.94%. However, when being drawn in by low rates, it’s important to make sure you’re not caught out by other fees.

At The Salary Calculator, we’ll walk you through some of the basics of the mortgage market. This article will explain:

  • The different types of mortgage rates
  • How to access the better rates
  • Initiatives for first-time buyers
  • Best rated mortgage lenders
  • How to choose the right mortgage for you

The different types of mortgages

There are two types of mortgages out there:

Fixed-rate mortgages: This kind of mortgage will see you pay a fixed rate for a set period of time, usually from between two to ten years.

Variable-rate mortgages: This kind of mortgage is not fixed at a set price, can vary from month to month, and comes in a few different forms.

  • Tracker mortgages: This type of variable mortgage follows or ‘tracks’ a specific index, typically the Bank of England’s base rate, for a set period.
  • Discounted rate mortgages: This type of variable mortgage is set below the lender’s standard variable rate (SVR) for a defined period of time.
  • Capped rate mortgages: This type of mortgage is also variable, meaning it can go up or down, but a cap is placed on the level it can rise.

How to access the better rates

When looking to secure the best mortgage rates out there, several factors can improve your chances.

A good credit score is a big factor taken into consideration when lenders make a decision. A low credit score indicates that a borrower may be less financially reliable and more likely to default on payments in the eyes of a lender. Likewise, a high score indicates more stability and less risk.

However, it’s not the be-all and end-all if your credit rating isn’t the highest it can be. You can boost your score. This can be done by making sure you reliably make payments, keeping your credit utilisation low, and building your credit history.

To get the best deal on your mortgage, you must also compare deals. While you may think that you’ve found a good deal, without shopping around, you may miss out. There are lots of comparison websites out there that can help you with your search.

Another good tip for securing a good rate is to try and pay a large deposit if you can afford it. This will show the lender that you are less of a risk credit-wise and lead to lower interest rates.

Initiatives for first-time buyers

There are some schemes to help those buying a home for the first time to make the process a little smoother.

The First Homes scheme was introduced to create more affordable housing and offers homes at a discount of 30% compared to the market price.

The 95% Mortgage Scheme was introduced in the Spring Budget 2021 and allows individuals to borrow up to 95% of a property’s purchase price and secure a mortgage with just a 5% deposit.

Best rated mortgage lenders

In the UK, there are lots of mortgage lenders to choose from, over one-hundred in fact. Some of the biggest lenders include The Lloyds Banking Group, Nationwide Building Society, and Royal Bank of Scotland.

Trussle found, when comparing customer satisfaction, the mortgage lenders that scored the highest included Bank of Ireland, Post Office, and Aldermore.

Those that scored the highest regarding the fastest approval of new mortgage submissions included Halifax, BM Solutions, and HSBC.

Choosing the right mortgage for you

Each person will be looking for different things when choosing a mortgage; for example, you could be buying a house for the first time, remortgaging, moving house or even buying to let.  As a result, one size does not fit all.

Mortgage comparison websites are your friend here, and it’s also worth reaching out to a mortgage broker for advice. After all, choosing a mortgage is a life-changing and important decision that will affect you and your finances for years to come.

Moneyfacts, an independent money comparison website, lists that for home-movers, some of the lowest rates are currently offered by NatWest and RBS, which both have a rate of 1.04% for the first two years before returning to 3.59%. Both also have product fees of £995.00.

The lowest three year fixed rate for home-movers comes from Virgin Money, which offers a rate of 2.15%, before reverting back to 4.34% and has a product fee of £995.00.

First-time buyers, meanwhile, can secure one of the lowest rates from First Direct, which offers 2.69% fixed for two years, when it reverts to 3.54%. There is a £490.00 product fee.

NatWest also offers a low rate, at a fixed rate of 2.69%, before returning to 3.59%, with product fees of £995.00.

The lowest five-year fixed rate for first-time buyers can also be found at First Direct at 3.14%, which reverts back to 3.54% after five years.

For those looking to buy-to-let, The Mortgage Works offers a rate of 1.19% for two years before reverting to a 4.74% variable. This mortgage has a 2.00% advance.

Another mortgage with a low rate comes from Virgin Money, which has a rate of 1.48%, for two years before returning to a 4.54% variable, with an arrangement fee of £1995.

Virgin Money also offers the lowest 3-year fixed buy-to-let deal, with a rate of 1.71%, which reverts to a 4.54% variable. It has an arrangement fee of 4.54% Variable.

It’s worth noting that just because these providers offer the lowest rates doesn’t mean that they are necessarily the best deals. When making a decision, it’s important to factor in total product fees, incentives and the full costs. Rates are also constantly changing, so it’s best to review the charts regularly before settling.

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Wednesday, July 28th, 2021 Mortgages No Comments

None of the content on this website, including blog posts, comments, or responses to user comments, is offered as financial advice. Figures used are for illustrative purposes only.

Interest rates in the UK

by Madaline Dunn

When it comes to borrowing, be it for a mortgage or a loan, an interest rate will be applied to the amount you borrow. The same goes for any savings you accumulate. That said, it can be tricky to get your head around the ins and outs of interest rates.

According to a study conducted by MoneySuperMarket, 70% of those polled didn’t know what the base rate was. That means there are lots of people out there that could do with a helping hand.

At The Salary Calculator, we’ll give you the rundown of interest rates in the UK and make sure you’re updated with the latest. This article will explain:

  • What an interest rate is
  • What the base rate is 
  • What the current interest rates are
  • The different types of interest rates
  • Whether or not interest rates will rise
  • The pros and cons of the current low rates

What is an interest rate?

An interest rate refers to either the percentage an individual is charged for borrowing money or earned through saving. It is typically expressed as a percentage of the amount you borrow or save over a year.

What is the base rate?

The base rate or bank rate is the most important interest rate in the UK and refers to the rate at which banks and lenders are charged for borrowing. Currently, this rate is 0.1% which influences borrowing and saving interest rates.

Current rates

Interest varies from bank to bank, but often it can cost more to borrow less. According to MoneySavingExpert, the best interest rates for loans of between £3,000 – £4,999 range from 7.3% rep APR and 8.4% rep APR.

For larger amounts, for example, between £15,001 – £20,000, the best interest rates range from between 2.8% rep APR and 2.9% rep APR.

When it comes to savings, easy access accounts with best rates range from between 0.4% AER variable and 0.5% AER variable.

The different types of interest rates

There are a few different types of interest rates, these are:

Fixed Rate of Interest – With this interest rate, the amount you are paid, or the amount you owe, is at a set rate that remains unchanged throughout the term of your account. 

Variable Rate of Interest – Also known as a “floating rate,” with this interest rate, the amount of interest you are paid or the amount of interest you owe can change depending on the base rate.

When exploring loans and savings, you will likely run into two other terms, APR and AER. But what exactly do they mean? 

APR – Annual Percentage Rate: This refers to the total cost of borrowing money in a year (loan or credit card). Included within this are interest and standard fees.

AER – Annual Equivalent Rate: This type of interest applies to saving accounts and is the amount you earn in a year.     

Will interest rates rise?

It is difficult to determine for sure whether interest rates will rise. However, considering the current state of the economy, having shrunk by 19.8% in 2020, interest rates are unlikely to rise any time soon.

The pros and cons of the current low rates

When it comes to low interest rates, there are, of course, advantages and disadvantages. These are as follows:

Pros:

  • Lower interest rates make it easier for people to borrow money
  • When borrowing is made more accessible, this can drive investment
  • Low rates can also make housing more affordable by lowering mortgage payments

On the other hand…

Cons:

  • Lower interest rates can detrimentally impact savers because they earn less through interest
  • As a result, this can reduce the incentive to save
  • Low interest can also lead to people taking on more debt than they can afford 

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Friday, May 28th, 2021 Loans, Mortgages, Savings No Comments

Budget 2013

by Admin

In yesterday’s budget, the Chancellor George Osborne outlined his plans for the next couple of years. In terms of take home pay from April onwards, there were no real surprises – the personal allowance has been increased and the top “Additional rate” tax has been reduced from 50% to 45%. In an earlier blog post I have described how these changes have been applied to The Salary Calculator.

Those who are repaying their student loan could be saving as much as £50 next year, as the threshold for repayment has increased from £15,795 to £16,365 – so the deductions from their salary will be less from April. However, the flip side of this is that because less of the loan is being repaid, it will take longer for the loan to be paid off in full and therefore will cost more in the long term.

What I found most interesting about the Chancellor’s announcements yesterday was the extension of an existing scheme for people buying their first house (FirstBuy) to allow more people to take part. The new scheme is called Help to Buy, and will help people to buy a new-build home with a 5% deposit, even if they can’t get the rest of the 95% from a mortgage lender. The government will provide a loan (interest-free for 5 years) for up to 20% of the value of the house, leaving buyers to find only 75% from a mortgage lender. In return, the government will get a share of the equity in the house – so if the house price increases, the amount repayable when the house is sold will increase at the same rate. This scheme is available to first-time buyers and to people who are already on the housing ladder – it does not have to be your first house purchase – and the value of the house can be up to £600,000.

There is also a scheme to help people buy houses which are not new-built, where instead of providing some of the money, the government will guarantee some of the mortgage so that if the buyers default, the lender gets some of the money from the government. This is aimed at encouraging lenders to allow people with small (5%) deposits to borrow.

If it takes off, this scheme has the potential to help people who are currently struggling to buy a home because they don’t have a large enough deposit. It may also help to stimulate the house construction industry, and bolster a flagging property market. The treasury has provided an infographic with some details.

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Thursday, March 21st, 2013 Economy, Mortgages, Pay As You Earn 2 Comments

Save money with offset mortgage

by Admin

Over on our sister site LoanTutor, there is a new tool and a new article trying to explain what an offset mortgage is and how it could help you save money. With an offset mortgage, you use your savings to effectively cancel out some of your mortgage balance, which reduces the interest your lender charges you. You can use this to either reduce your monthly payments, or keep your payments the same and pay off your mortgage quicker.

If you would like to learn more, have a read of the offset mortgage article, or to see how much you might be able to save try out the offset mortgage calculator.

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Thursday, November 29th, 2012 Mortgages No Comments

Loan Tutor website launched!

by Admin

A new sister site to The Salary Calculator has been launched to provide information about loans and loan repayment.

Loan Tutor contains details about different loan types, such as mortgages, unsecured loans, debt consolidation loans and student loans. As well as a suite of tools for calculating loan repayment costs, there are also hints and tips and links to further information about borrowing money.

There will also be articles with suggestions of how you can save money with loans, including the first of these which explains how to avoid overpaying your student loan. Other articles and tools are planned for the future, including car loans, offset mortgages and credit cards.

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Tuesday, August 7th, 2012 About The Salary Calculator No Comments

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