taxes

The new tax year: Changes and preparations for April 2022

by Madaline Dunn

The new tax year is almost upon us, and a number of changes are coming into effect in April 2022. These changes could hit you in the pocket, so there may be some preparations you may need to make to ensure you’re ready.

From council tax, car tax, pensions and tax codes, make sure you’ve got your finger on the pulse this April. At The Salary Calculator, we’ll walk you through:

  • What is staying the same
  • Incoming changes to council tax
  • The new changes coming in for car tax
  • What’s happening with pensions
  • What to check before 5th April
  • How to work out any changes to your taxes

What will stay the same in the new tax year?

Although the new tax year often brings in changes to the amount of tax people pay, as per Chancellor Rishi Sunak’s budget, there will be a number of freezes rather than cuts.

Income tax is frozen for this year and will remain that way until 2026. So, the threshold of £12,570 will stay the same, as well as the basic rate tax of 20%, which you will pay on any earnings over that amount up to £50,270. While this may sound positive at first, according to the Centre for Economics and Business Research (CEBR), over nine million workers will pay more as a result.

However, the situation in Scotland is different, as a devolved nation, there are different rates and thresholds when it comes to income tax. Any changes can be viewed here on the Scottish government website.

Capital gains tax which people pay when they make a profit on assets such as a buy to let property, and the allowance on this tax, which is set at £12,300 is also being frozen until 2026.

What changes are coming for council tax?

In February, Chancellor Rishi Sunak announced that roughly 20 million households in council tax bands A to D in England will be impacted by a £3bn council tax rebate. According to the government, this includes 95% of rented properties and the rebate does not have to be repaid.

The same kind of scheme is going ahead in both Scotland and Wales, with the former offering a £150 council tax rebate.

According to the Local Government Association (LGA), those eligible should set up a direct debit to speed up the process. Cllr Shaun Davies, LGA’s Resources Board chairman, outlined that without taking that step, it could “take longer.” This is because the local council will have to reach out first and then individuals will have to make a claim themselves.

While those living in bands E to H in England and Scotland won’t be eligible, you can check your eligibility by visiting the government website.

What changes will come into effect for car tax?

Car tax, otherwise known as Vehicle Excise Duty (VED), is increasing in April, and the amount you pay will depend on a few factors, including how old your vehicle is and the amount of emissions it produces.

To work out how your vehicle will be affected by the new changes, head over here, where you’ll be able to work out if you’ll encounter any increases.

What’s ahead for pensions

When it comes to the changes in store for pensions, there has been a suspension of the triple lock and instead, a new double lock is being temporarily introduced.

As per the triple lock, the state pension rises in line with the highest of the following three measures every year:

  • A flat 2.5% rise
  • Average earnings growth
  • Inflation

It also applied to both the basic state pension and the new state pension. That said, the new double lock means that for 2022-23, the state pension will either rise by 2.5% or the inflation rate, which will, according to the government, last until 2023-24.

What to look out for this April

As the new tax year approaches, experts warn that people should lookout for a number of things.

The first thing to check is your tax code. While the most common tax code for the tax year 2021/22 and 2022/23 is 1257L, which will not change until 2026, it’s your responsibility to check that you’re not using the wrong one. Through checking if your tax code is correct, you’ll also be able to review whether you are owed money from HMRC or owe money.

As recently covered by The Salary Calculator, NI contributions will go up in April, too, so make sure you’re up-to-date with how the upcoming NI contribution changes will affect you.

Likewise, it has been advised that those who had to work from home during the 2020 lockdown or during the 2021/22 financial year to claim should review their entitlement to tax relief. This can be worth up to £125 from HMRC, and people are being encouraged to check what they’re owed before April 5, which could see the introduction of a rule change on claiming to work from home tax allowance.

How to work out any changes to your taxes

It’s always best to prepare for what’s in store, and if you want to check out how your finances will be affected by the upcoming changes in April, head over to The Salary Calculator, where you’ll be able to work out your take-home pay.

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Thursday, March 17th, 2022 Economy 2 Comments

None of the content on this website, including blog posts, comments, or responses to user comments, is offered as financial advice. Figures used are for illustrative purposes only.

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